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Gynodioecy in Plantago lanceolata L. IV. Fitness Components of Sex Types in Different Life Cycle Stages

Jos M. M. Van Damme and Wilke Van Delden
Evolution
Vol. 38, No. 6 (Nov., 1984), pp. 1326-1336
DOI: 10.2307/2408638
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408638
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Gynodioecy in Plantago lanceolata L. IV. Fitness Components of Sex Types in Different Life Cycle Stages
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to establish to what extent different life cycle characters contribute to fitness differences between sex types, necessary for the maintenance of the gynodioecious breeding system. One of the male sterility types occurring in Plantago lanceolata (MS1), the corresponding partial male sterility type (IN1), and hermaphrodites (H) have been studied in a natural population. The pre-adult phase of the life cycle was investigated by sowing and transplant experiments. No differences between sexes were found in any of the characters studied (seedling establishment, survival and growth of juvenile plants). Individual adult plants were observed for a maximum of two years. MS1 exceeded H considerably in survival rate, and also in seed production and seed mass. There were no differences in these characters between MS1 and IN1 plants. Differences in adult survival and seed mass appeared to be influenced by environmental variation. It is argued that the absence of a difference between male steriles and hermaphrodites in female fertility and the concentration of fitness differences in other, secondary, sex characters, is typical for stable gynodioecious species such as Plantago lanceolata.

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