Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Parasite Pressure and the Evolution of Amanitin Tolerance in Drosophila

John Jaenike
Evolution
Vol. 39, No. 6 (Nov., 1985), pp. 1295-1301
DOI: 10.2307/2408786
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408786
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Parasite Pressure and the Evolution of Amanitin Tolerance in Drosophila
Preview not available

Abstract

Approximately one-half of the members of the Drosophila quinaria species-group are mycophagous. The mushroom-breeding species D. falleni, D. recens, and D. phalerata are far more tolerant of the mushroom toxin α-amanitin than are D. quinaria, D. palustris, and D. subpalustris, which breed in decaying water plants. The non-mycophagous species, however, are physiologically capable of larval development in mushrooms, showing that high levels of amanitin tolerance are not necessary for mycophagy. A primary selective advantage of amanitin tolerance among the mycophagous species is that it allows them to breed in mushrooms that are toxic to nematodes that infest Drosophila in other fungi and render them infertile. Parasitism, then, may be an important factor governing evolutionary patterns of resource utilization in these species.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1295
    1295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1296
    1296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1297
    1297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1298
    1298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1299
    1299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1300
    1300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1301
    1301