Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Inbreeding and the Cost of Meiosis: The Evolution of Selfing in Populations Practicing Biparental Inbreeding

Marcy K. Uyenoyama
Evolution
Vol. 40, No. 2 (Mar., 1986), pp. 388-404
DOI: 10.2307/2408817
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2408817
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Inbreeding and the Cost of Meiosis: The Evolution of Selfing in Populations Practicing Biparental Inbreeding
Preview not available

Abstract

The effect of biparental inbreeding on the conditions governing the evolution of selfing is examined using recursions in mating-type frequencies. Sibmating in combination with random outcrossing influences two key determinants of the adaptive value of selfing: 1) the meiotic cost of biparental reproduction and 2) the level of inbreeding depression due to deleterious mutations. Biparental inbreeding serves to maintain biparental reproduction by increasing relatedness between parents and their biparentally derived offspring and introduces the possibility of an optimal mating system that incorporates both modes of reproduction. Biparental inbreeding serves to promote uniparental reproduction by reducing the relative inbreeding depression suffered by uniparental offspring. The net effect of these two antagonistic trends depends upon the extent to which mutational load accounts for differences in the numbers of the two types of offspring. A brief summary of the empirical literature suggests that: 1) biparental inbreeding may occur in populations exhibiting mixed mating systems; 2) while inbreeding depression represents an important factor, it does not account entirely for differences in offspring number between the two modes of reproduction.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388
  • Thumbnail: Page 
389
    389
  • Thumbnail: Page 
390
    390
  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
397
    397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
398
    398
  • Thumbnail: Page 
399
    399
  • Thumbnail: Page 
400
    400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
401
    401
  • Thumbnail: Page 
402
    402
  • Thumbnail: Page 
403
    403
  • Thumbnail: Page 
404
    404