Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Patterns and Processes of Diversification: Speciation and Historical Congruence in Some Neotropical Birds

Joel Cracraft and Richard O. Prum
Evolution
Vol. 42, No. 3 (May, 1988), pp. 603-620
DOI: 10.2307/2409043
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409043
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Patterns and Processes of Diversification: Speciation and Historical Congruence in Some Neotropical Birds
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper documents congruence in geographical patterns of speciation for four clades of birds having taxa endemic to the same areas within the Neotropics. Two genera, Pionopsitta parrots and Selenidera toucans, corroborate a well known biogeographic disjunction in which taxa endemic to southern Central America and the Choco region of northwestern South America are the sister-group to a radiation within the Amazon basin. These two genera, along with two lineages within the toucan genus Pteroglossus, also document a pattern of historical interrelationships for four well known areas of endemism within Amazonia: Guyanan + (Belem-Para + (Inambari + Napo)). These generalized historical patterns are interpreted to have arisen via fragmentation (vicariance) of a widespread ancestral biota. A review of the paleogeographic evidence suggests that these vicariance events could have originated as a result of several different mechanisms operating at various times during the Cenozoic. The inference that diversification of the Neotropical biota is primarily the result of the most recent of these possible vicariance events, namely isolation within Quaternary forest refugia, is unwarranted, given present data. These patterns of historical congruence are also interpreted as direct evidence against the hypothesis that diversification of the forest biota was a consequence of parapatric differentiation along recently established ecological gradients.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
603
    603
  • Thumbnail: Page 
604
    604
  • Thumbnail: Page 
605
    605
  • Thumbnail: Page 
606
    606
  • Thumbnail: Page 
607
    607
  • Thumbnail: Page 
608
    608
  • Thumbnail: Page 
609
    609
  • Thumbnail: Page 
610
    610
  • Thumbnail: Page 
611
    611
  • Thumbnail: Page 
612
    612
  • Thumbnail: Page 
613
    613
  • Thumbnail: Page 
614
    614
  • Thumbnail: Page 
615
    615
  • Thumbnail: Page 
616
    616
  • Thumbnail: Page 
617
    617
  • Thumbnail: Page 
618
    618
  • Thumbnail: Page 
619
    619
  • Thumbnail: Page 
620
    620