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Geographic Population Structure and Species Differences in Mitochondrial DNA of Mouthbrooding Marine Catfishes (Ariidae) and Demersal Spawning Toadfishes (Batrachoididae)

John C. Avise, Carol A. Reeb and Nancy C. Saunders
Evolution
Vol. 41, No. 5 (Sep., 1987), pp. 991-1002
DOI: 10.2307/2409187
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409187
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Geographic Population Structure and Species Differences in Mitochondrial DNA of Mouthbrooding Marine Catfishes (Ariidae) and Demersal Spawning Toadfishes (Batrachoididae)
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Abstract

Restriction-fragment length polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were used to evaluate population-genetic structure and matriarchal phylogeny in four species of marine fishes that lack a pelagic larval stage: the catfishes Arius felis and Bagre marinus, and the toadfishes Opsanus tau and O. beta. Thirteen informative restriction enzymes were used to assay mtDNAs from 134 specimens collected from Massachusetts to Louisiana. Considerable genotypic diversity was observed in each species. However, major mtDNA phylogenetic assemblages in catfish and toadfish (as identified in Wagner networks and UPGMA phenograms) exhibited contrasting patterns of geographic distribution: in catfish, distinct mtDNA clades were widespread, while such clades in toadfish tended to be geographically localized. By both the criteria of species' ranges and the geographic pattern of intraspecific mtDNA phylogeny, populations of marine catfish in the western Atlantic have had greater historical interconnectedness than have toadfish. Results are also compared to previously published mtDNA data in freshwater and other marine fishes. Although mtDNA differentiation among conspecific populations of continuously distributed marine fishes is usually lower than that among discontinuously distributed freshwater species inhabiting separate drainages, it is apparent that historical biogeographic factors can importantly influence genetic structure in marine as well as freshwater species.

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