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Journal Article

Evolutionary Implications of DNA Divergence in the Drosophila obscura Group

Kathryn Goddard, Adalgisa Caccone and Jeffrey R. Powell
Evolution
Vol. 44, No. 6 (Sep., 1990), pp. 1656-1670
DOI: 10.2307/2409345
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409345
Page Count: 15

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Topics: Species, Drosophila, Hybridity, Genetics, Evolution, DNA, Bogs, Mitochondrial DNA, Taxa, Divergent evolution
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Evolutionary Implications of DNA Divergence in the Drosophila obscura Group
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Abstract

Using DNA-DNA hybridization, we have determined the degree of single-copy DNA (scDNA) divergence among eight species of the Drosophila obscura group. These include Old World and New World species as well as members of two subgroups. Contrary to classical systematics, members of the affinis subgroup are more closely related to American members of the obscura subgroup than are Old World species. The Old World species are not a monophyletic group. The degree of scDNA divergence among species is not necessarily correlated with morphology, chromosomal divergence, or ability to form hybrids. A unique pattern of hybrid formation was found: species separated by a Δ Tm of 6.5⚬C can form hybrids whereas species separated by a Δ Tm of 2.5⚬C cannot. As with other groups of Drosophila, the obscura group has discrete parts of the genome evolving at very different rates. The slow evolving fraction of the nuclear genome is evolving at about the same rate as mitochondrial DNA. The additional scDNA divergence accompanying the step from partial reproductive isolation (between North American pseudoobscura and the isolated Bogota population) to full isolation is very small. The resolution of the technique was challenged by five closely related taxa with a maximum Δ Tm of 2.5⚬C separating them; the taxa were unambiguously resolved and the "correct" phylogeny recovered. Finally, there is some indication that scDNA in the obscura group may be evolving considerably slower than in the melanogaster subgroup.

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