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Enhancement of Inbreeding Depression by Dominance and Suppression in Impatiens capensis

Johanna Schmitt and David W. Ehrhardt
Evolution
Vol. 44, No. 2 (Mar., 1990), pp. 269-278
DOI: 10.2307/2409406
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409406
Page Count: 10
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Enhancement of Inbreeding Depression by Dominance and Suppression in Impatiens capensis
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Abstract

We investigated the effect of intraspecific competition on the magnitude of inbreeding depression in Impatiens capensis by planting seeds from chasmogamous (CH) and cleistogamous (CL) flowers in three experimental greenhouse treatments: in individual pots, in flats in dense pure stands according to seed type, and in flats with the two seed types intermixed in a checkerboard array. The size distributions of plants grown in flats were significantly more hierarchical than those of plants grown individually, indicating that larger plants competitively suppressed smaller plants in the high-density treatments. The magnitude of inbreeding depression at high density depended upon the planting arrangement of CL and CH seeds. CH advantage was greatest when CH and CL seedlings were grown in competition with one another, suggesting that fitness differences between outcrossed and inbred individuals were intensified by dominance and suppression. For plants grown individually, the effects of maternal parent, seed weight, and emergence date on seedling size disappeared with plant age, whereas at high density these effects remained at the final harvest. Thus, plant density may influence patterns of natural selection both on mating system and on juvenile traits in natural Impatiens populations.

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