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Ploidy and Evolution by Sexual Selection: A Comparison of Haploid and Diploid Female Choice Models Near Fixation Equilibria

Richard S. Gomulkiewicz and Alan Hastings
Evolution
Vol. 44, No. 4 (Jul., 1990), pp. 757-770
DOI: 10.2307/2409544
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409544
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ploidy and Evolution by Sexual Selection: A Comparison of Haploid and Diploid Female Choice Models Near Fixation Equilibria
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Abstract

We compare the stability properties of haploid and diploid models of Fisherian sexual selection (with male contribution limited to sperm) by examining both models at equilibria for which a male trait is fixed or absent. Haploid and diploid two locus diallelic models share the property that the stability of such fixation equilibria is determined by the relationship between the harmonic mean of relative preference values for the common male trait, weighted by the frequency of the preferences, and the relative viability associated with the common male trait. When diploid females with heterozygotic-based preferences express preference strengths intermediate between homozygote-based preferences, then boundary equilibria of haploid and diploid models share many stability properties. However, even with intermediate heterozygote preferences, haploid and diploid models do differ: (1) for a particular frequency of the preference allele, both fixation boundaries can be stable for the diploid model, and (2) with over- or underdominance at the preference locus (a possibility precluded in the haploid model), a fixation boundary in the diploid model may show two switches in its stability state for increasing frequencies of one of the preference alleles. These differences are due not just to the impossibility of dominance in haploid models, but also to the larger number of diploid genotypes.

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