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Haldane's Rule and Sex Biassed Gene Flow between Two Hybridizing Flycatcher Species (Ficedula albicollis and F. hypoleuca, Aves: Muscicapidae)

Hakan Tegelstrom and Hans P. Gelter
Evolution
Vol. 44, No. 8 (Dec., 1990), pp. 2012-2021
DOI: 10.2307/2409611
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409611
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Haldane's Rule and Sex Biassed Gene Flow between Two Hybridizing Flycatcher Species (Ficedula albicollis and F. hypoleuca, Aves: Muscicapidae)
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Abstract

The collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) and the pied flycatcher (F hypoleuca) hybridize where their geographic ranges overlap. Restriction fragment comparison of 5% of the mitochondrial genome showed a sequence divergence of 10% between these flycatcher species. This degree of sequence divergence between a closely related pair of bird species is unusually high and contrasts with the low level of divergence between F. albicollis and F. hypoleuca in nuclear genes (Nei's D = 0.0006) revealed by enzyme electrophoresis. The low nuclear differentiation is explained by sex biassed gene flow and introgression in nuclear genes (via fertile male hybrids), while the high mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence is preserved by sterility of female hybrids, which prevents mitochondrial introgression. This pattern is in accordance with Haldane's rule and is supported by field data on hybrid fertility. The high mtDNA differentiation could be explained by transfer of mitochondrial DNA from a third species during a past period of hybridization.

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