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Gene Flow in Chamaecrista fasciculata (Leguminosae) II. Gene Establishment

Charles B. Fenster
Evolution
Vol. 45, No. 2 (Mar., 1991), pp. 410-422
DOI: 10.2307/2409674
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409674
Page Count: 13
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Gene Flow in Chamaecrista fasciculata (Leguminosae) II. Gene Establishment
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Abstract

The role of gene establishment in gene flow was investigated in a population of the annual legume Chamaecrista fasciculata by determining the effect of interparent distance on progeny fitness throughout the entire life history. A decelerating gain in progeny fitness with increasing interparent distance was observed. Selfed progeny suffered a 2-fold fitness disadvantage compared to progeny derived from mating events between individuals in the same neighborhood. Progeny derived from within neighborhood crosses had lower fitness than progeny from crosses between neighborhoods. Coupling the effect of interparent distance on gene establishment with information on gene dispersal resulted in a considerable increase in estimated gene flow. However, gene flow was still limited, as the average neighborhood area corresponded to a circle with radius of approximately 3.0 m. Yearly fluctuations in population size and variation in reproductive output lowered the estimate of Ne below the census estimate to approximately 100 individuals. The role of a seed bank in increasing the estimate of Ne was found to be insignificant. It is likely that genetic drift plays a major role in determining the distribution of genetic variation in this population.

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