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Heritable Variation in Resource Utilization and Response in a Winery Population of Drosophila melanogaster

Ary A. Hoffmann and Stephen W. McKechnie
Evolution
Vol. 45, No. 4 (Jun., 1991), pp. 1000-1015
DOI: 10.2307/2409705
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409705
Page Count: 16
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Heritable Variation in Resource Utilization and Response in a Winery Population of Drosophila melanogaster
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Abstract

It has been found that Drosophila melanogaster lines from the "Chateau Tahbilk" winery cellar had higher larval ethanol resistance than lines originating from outside the cellar. Because the adaptive significance of this trait is unclear, we have reexamined genetic microdifferentiation at Tahbilk with other resources and different tests for ethanol adaptation. Cellar stocks tended to be more resistant to starvation after exposure to wine seepage than stocks originating from orchard traps outside the cellar. Lines from a grape residue pile were also more resistant to starvation after seepage exposure than orchard stocks even though these collection sites were a few meters apart. Cellar and orchard stocks did not differ in ethanol resistance as measured by larval viability tests on low sucrose medium. However, stocks from the grape residue pile showed an increase in adult longevity over ethanol vapor compared to those from the cellar or orchard stocks. These differences were not due to maternal effects. In laboratory tests of behavioral responses, cellar stocks were relatively more attracted to seepage than orchard stocks in one year but not in the other two years. The findings suggest some adaptive differentiation related to resource heterogeneity at Tahbilk.

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