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Genetic and Social Inheritance of Body and Egg Size in the Barnacle Goose (Branta leucopsis)

Kjell Larsson and Par Forslund
Evolution
Vol. 46, No. 1 (Feb., 1992), pp. 235-244
DOI: 10.2307/2409818
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409818
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Genetic and Social Inheritance of Body and Egg Size in the Barnacle Goose (Branta leucopsis)
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Abstract

We present heritability estimates for final size of body traits and egg size as well as phenotypic and genetic correlations between body and egg traits in a recently established population of the barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis) in the Baltic area. Body traits as well as egg size were heritable and, hence, could respond evolutionarily to phenotypic selection. Genetic correlations between body size traits were significantly positive and of similar magnitude or higher than the corresponding phenotypic correlations. Heritability estimates for tarsus length obtained from fullsib analyses were higher than those obtained from midoffspring-midparent regressions, and this indicates common environment effects on siblings. Heritabilities for tarsus length obtained from midoffspring-mother regressions were significantly higher than estimates from midoffspring-father regressions. The results suggest that this discrepancy is not caused by maternal effects through egg size, nor by extra-pair fertilizations, but by a socially inherited foraging site fidelity in females.

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