If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A General Model for Kin Selection

David C. Queller
Evolution
Vol. 46, No. 2 (Apr., 1992), pp. 376-380
DOI: 10.2307/2409858
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2409858
Page Count: 5
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A General Model for Kin Selection
Preview not available

Abstract

Inclusive fitness theory is central to our understanding of the evolution of social behavior. By showing the importance of genetic transmission through nondescendent relatives, it helps to explain the evolution of reproductively altruistic behaviors, such as those observed in the social insects. Inclusive fitness thinking is quantified by Hamilton's rule, but Hamilton's rule has often been criticized for being inexact or insufficiently general. Here I show how adopting a genic perspective yields a very general version that remains pleasingly simple and transparent.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
376
    376
  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
380
    380