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Inbreeding Depression in Hydrophyllum appendiculatum: Role of Maternal Effects, Crowding, and Parental Mating History

Lorne M. Wolfe
Evolution
Vol. 47, No. 2 (Apr., 1993), pp. 374-386
DOI: 10.2307/2410058
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410058
Page Count: 13
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Inbreeding Depression in Hydrophyllum appendiculatum: Role of Maternal Effects, Crowding, and Parental Mating History
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Abstract

This paper examines several aspects of the expression of inbreeding depression in an outcrossing, obligately biennial plant, Hydrophyllum appendiculatum (Hydrophyllaceae). The amount of inbreeding depression detected was small during the first year of life but increased with age and had significant effects on adult size and reproductive traits. The lack of significant inbreeding depression during early growth is likely due to the overriding influence of maternal environmental effects on seed size and seedling growth. However, as maternal effects decreased with age, the seedling's own genotype became a more important determinant of its fate. To examine whether the expression of inbreeding depression was sensitive to ecological conditions, selfed and outcrossed seedlings were grown alone or with other H. appendiculatum seedlings. No inbreeding depression was detected in the plants grown alone. In contrast, under competitive conditions, outcrossed seedlings were significantly larger than selfed seedlings by the end of the first growing season. To address whether parental mating history influences the amount of inbreeding depression expressed, I examined the consequences of two successive generations of selfing on seed set and seed weight. The amount of inbreeding depression increased following the second generation of selfing. In the first generation, seed set and seed weight differed by less than 5% between selfed and outcrossed progeny. However, both traits were 15% greater for outcrossed plants after two generations. These results indicate that the alleles responsible for the reductions in these traits were not purged and suggest the action of multiple loci with deleterious effects.

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