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Absence of Pollen Discounting in a Genotype of Ipomoea purpurea Exhibiting Increased Selfing

Mark D. Rausher, David Augustine and Amy VanderKooi
Evolution
Vol. 47, No. 6 (Dec., 1993), pp. 1688-1695
DOI: 10.2307/2410213
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410213
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Absence of Pollen Discounting in a Genotype of Ipomoea purpurea Exhibiting Increased Selfing
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Abstract

Throughout southeastern North America, the annual morning glory Ipomoea purpurea exhibits a polymorphism at a locus that influences the intensity of floral pigmentation. Previous studies have shown that when rare, the homozygous white genotype has a greater selfing rate than the homozygous dark genotype. In the absence of pollen discounting (a reduction in transmission of pollen to other plants by genotypes that exhibit increased selfing) and inbreeding depression, this increased selfing rate should favor the white allele. Experiments reported here confirm that the white genotype has elevated selfing rates when rare but indicate pollen discounting is not associated with elevated selfing. Rather, white genotypes contribute more pollen to the outcross pollen pool. The disparity between genotypes in both selfing rates and success at pollen contribution to other plants disappears at intermediate to high frequencies of the white allele. Pollinator movements are consistent with the pattern of selfing. These results suggest that elevated selfing and enhanced success at pollen donation contribute to maintenance of the white allele in natural populations of morning glories.

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