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Inbreeding Depression in Morphological and Physiological Traits of Schiedea lydgatei (Caryophyllaceae) in Two Environments

Joanna K. Norman, Ann K. Sakai, Stephen G. Weller and Todd E. Dawson
Evolution
Vol. 49, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 297-306
DOI: 10.2307/2410340
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410340
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Inbreeding Depression in Morphological and Physiological Traits of Schiedea lydgatei (Caryophyllaceae) in Two Environments
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Abstract

We compared inbreeding depression in hermaphroditic Schiedea lydgatei and its gynodioecious sister species, S. salicaria, to infer the level of inbreeding depression in their common ancestor. With measurements of selfing rates, this information can be used to assess the importance of inbreeding depression in the evolution of breeding systems in S. lydgatei and S. salicaria. Morphological and physiological characters related to fitness were compared for inbred and outcrossed S. lydgatei in high- and low-fertilizer environments in the greenhouse. Seed mass, number of seeds per capsule, germination, survival, biomass, number of flowers, and age at first flowering were compared for inbred versus outcrossed progeny We also measured inbreeding depression in maximal rates of photosynthetic carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance to water vapor, traits that affect fitness through their influence on plant carbon balance and water-use efficiency (ratio of carbon gain to water loss). All traits except number of seeds per capsule in parents and survival showed inbreeding depression, with the magnitude depending on family and environment. High inbreeding depression is likely in the ancestor of S. lydgatei and S. salicaria, indicating that, with sufficiently high selfing rates, females could spread in populations. Hermaphroditism in S. lydgatei is probably favored by low selfing rates. In contrast, the evolution of gynodioecy in S. salicaria apparently has been favored by relatively high selfing rates in combination with high inbreeding depression.

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