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The Quantitative Genetics of Sexual Dimorphism in Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae). II. Response to Sex-Specific Selection

Thomas R. Meagher
Evolution
Vol. 48, No. 4 (Aug., 1994), pp. 939-951
DOI: 10.2307/2410357
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410357
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Quantitative Genetics of Sexual Dimorphism in Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae). II. Response to Sex-Specific Selection
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Abstract

A well established theoretical relationship exists between genetic correlations between the sexes and the dynamics of response to sex-specific selection. The present study investigates the response to sex-specific selection for two sexually dimorphic traits that have been documented to be genetically variable, calyx diameter and flower number, in Silene latifolia. Following the establishment of a base generation with a known genetic background, selection lines were established and two generations of sex-specific selection were imposed. Calyx diameter responded directly to sex-specific selection, and the positive genetic correlation between the sexes was reflected in correlated responses in the sex that was not the basis for selection within a particular line. Flower number showed a more erratic response to sex-specific selection in that selection in some lines was initially in the wrong direction, that is, selection for a decrease in flower number resulted in an increase. These erratic responses were attributable to genotype-environment interaction as reflected in significant heteroscedasticity in variance among families. Correlated responses to selection in the sex that was not the immediate basis for selection indicated the possible existence of a negative genetic correlation between the sexes for this trait. These results test for the first time the impact of genetic correlations between the sexes on the evolutionary dynamics of sexually dimorphic traits in a plant species.

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