Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Gene Genealogy and Differentiation Among Arboreal Spiny rats (Rodentia: Echimyidae) of the Amazon Basin: A Test of the Riverine Barrier Hypothesis

James L. Patton, Maria Nazareth F. Da Silva and Jay R. Malcolm
Evolution
Vol. 48, No. 4 (Aug., 1994), pp. 1314-1323
DOI: 10.2307/2410388
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410388
Page Count: 10

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Haplotypes, Rivers, Headwaters, Riverbanks, Mouth, Gene flow, Rats, River basins, Forest ecology, Genetics
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Gene Genealogy and Differentiation Among Arboreal Spiny rats (Rodentia: Echimyidae) of the Amazon Basin: A Test of the Riverine Barrier Hypothesis
Preview not available

Abstract

Sequence variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene was examined in the arboreal spiny rat, Mesomys hispidus, collected at 15 sites along the Rio Jurua in western Amazonia, Brazil, to determine the importance of riverine barriers in the diversification of this taxon. Twenty individual haplotypes were uncovered, most of which were unique to single localities but some of which were shared among adjacent sites either along or across the river. Genealogical analyses suggest that gene flow is limited and, in combination with the unique distribution of most haplotypes, suggest that populations of this species are strongly substructured along the river. Thus, most sharing of haplotypes between adjacent localities is probably caused by historical association rather than to ongoing gene flow. Two haplotype clades were uncovered, but these correspond to headwaters versus mouth areas, not to opposite sides of the river, as would be expected by the Riverine Barrier Hypothesis. Moreover, haplotype sharing across the river was greater at its mouth than in the headwaters, a pattern opposite that expected if the river were a substantive barrier. Broader scale phylogeographic patterns of this species show that both clades have relationships to areas well outside the Rio Jurua basin. This suggests that the basin represents a relatively recent point of invasion between two more broadly distributed and differentiated geographic units of the species.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1314
    1314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1315
    1315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1316
    1316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1317
    1317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1318
    1318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1319
    1319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1320
    1320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1321
    1321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1322
    1322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1323
    1323
Part of Sustainability