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The Dual Role of Selection and Evolutionary History as Reflected in Genetic Correlations

Robert W. Jernigan, David C. Culver and Daniel W. Fong
Evolution
Vol. 48, No. 3 (Jun., 1994), pp. 587-596
DOI: 10.2307/2410471
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410471
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Dual Role of Selection and Evolutionary History as Reflected in Genetic Correlations
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Abstract

The patterns of genetic correlations between a series of eye and antenna characters were compared among two sets of spring-dwelling and cave-dwelling populations of Gammarus minus. The two sets of populations originate from different drainages and represent two separate invasions of cave habitats from surface-dwelling populations. Matrix correlations, using permutation tests, indicated significant correlations both between populations in the same basin and from the same habitat. The technique of biplot, which allows for the simultaneous consideration of relationships between different genetic correlations and different populations, was used to further analyze the correlation structure. A rank-3 biplot indicated that spring and cave populations were largely differentiated by eye-antennal correlations, whereas basins were differentiated by both eye-antennal and antennal-antennal correlations. Eye-antennal correlations, which are likely to be subject to selection, were most similar within habitats, which are likely to have similar selective regimes.

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