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Chromosomal Versus Mitochondrial DNA Evolution: Tracking the Evolutionary History of the Southwestern European Populations of the Sorex araneus Group (Mammalia, Insectivora)

Pierre Taberlet, Luca Fumagalli and Jacques Hausser
Evolution
Vol. 48, No. 3 (Jun., 1994), pp. 623-636
DOI: 10.2307/2410474
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410474
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Chromosomal Versus Mitochondrial DNA Evolution: Tracking the Evolutionary History of the Southwestern European Populations of the Sorex araneus Group (Mammalia, Insectivora)
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Abstract

The shrews of the Sorex araneus group have undergone a spectacular chromosome evolution. The karyotype of Sorex granarius is generally considered ancestral to those of Sorex coronatus and S. araneus. However, a sequence of 777 base pairs of the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) produces a quite different picture: S. granarius is closely related to the populations of S. araneus from the Pyrenees and from the northwestern Alps, whereas S. coronatus and S. araneus from Italy and the southern Alps represent two well-separated lineages. It is suggested that mtDNA and chromosomal evolution are in this case largely independant processes. Whereas mtDNA haplotypes are closely linked to the geographical history of the populations, chromosomal mutations were probably transmitted from one population to another. Available data suggest that the impressive chromosome polymorphism of this group is quite a recent phenomenon.

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