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Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors on Population Fragmentation in Three Species of North American Minnows (Teleostei: Cyprinidae)

C. Alana Tibbets and Thomas E. Dowling
Evolution
Vol. 50, No. 3 (Jun., 1996), pp. 1280-1292
DOI: 10.2307/2410668
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410668
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors on Population Fragmentation in Three Species of North American Minnows (Teleostei: Cyprinidae)
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Abstract

Geographic patterns of genetic variation (mitochondrial DNA \[mtDNA\] and allozymes) were used to examine effects of intrinsic characteristics (e.g., vagility, habitat specificity, and reproductive behaviors) and extrinsic factors (e.g., climatic and geological history) on population fragmentation. The three species of cyprinid fishes examined (Tiaroga cobitis, Meda fulgida, and Agosia chrysogaster) occupied similar historical ranges within the lower Colorado River drainage, but differ in intrinsic characteristics conducive to population fragmentation. Relationships among populations were similar across species, reflecting common historical influences, but results indicate the distribution of variation among species is strongly affected by intrinsic characteristics. Variation within two species (T cobitis and M. fulgida) is subdivided among populations, suggesting little gene flow among rivers. In contrast, similarity of A. chrysogaster populations throughout the Gila River drainage supports the hypothesis that levels of gene flow are high for this species. Levels of mtDNA divergence were much higher than expected for both T. cobitis and A. chrysogaster suggesting long-term isolation of geographic regions. These results indicate that both long-term and short-term extrinsic factors have shaped basic patterns of variation within these fishes; however, the intrinsic characteristics of each species have strongly affected the population genetic structure of these fishes.

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