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A Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Thermal Sensitivity in the Locomotor Performance Curve of Aphidius ervi

George W. Gilchrist
Evolution
Vol. 50, No. 4 (Aug., 1996), pp. 1560-1572
DOI: 10.2307/2410892
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410892
Page Count: 13
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A Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Thermal Sensitivity in the Locomotor Performance Curve of Aphidius ervi
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Abstract

The thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance in Aphidius ervi, a parasitic hymenopteran, conforms to the "jack-of-all-trades is master of none" model of specialist-generalist trade-offs. Performance breadth and maximal performance at the phenotypic level are negatively correlated in both sexes. A strong, negative genetic correlation was found for males, but not for females. In males, the broad-sense heritability of performance breadth was about 0.16, and that of maximum walking velocity was about 0.29. Neither heritability was significantly different from zero in females. The broad-sense heritability of body mass was about 0.3 in females and 0.6 in males, with a strong negative genetic correlation between size and maximum velocity in males only. These data provide the first quantitative generic analysis of performance curves in eukaryotic animals, and one of the few demonstrations of the specialist-generalist trade-off that underlies much theory in evolutionary ecology.

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