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The Symmetry of Correlated Selection Responses in Adaptive Evolution: An Experimental Study Using Drosophila

Jason Shiotsugu, Armand M. Leroi, Hideko Yashiro, Michael R. Rose and Laurence D. Mueller
Evolution
Vol. 51, No. 1 (Feb., 1997), pp. 163-172
DOI: 10.2307/2410969
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2410969
Page Count: 10
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The Symmetry of Correlated Selection Responses in Adaptive Evolution: An Experimental Study Using Drosophila
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Abstract

The relationship between the processes of density-dependent and age-specific selection has been investigated by examining a common phenotype, urea resistance, which has apparently evolved in response to each of these selection mechanisms. Twenty populations that have experienced differing levels of age-specific selection show differences in egg-to-adult viability in environments with high levels of urea. Among this group of populations, it appears that resistance to urea is correlated with longevity, but not development time. Ten populations kept at extreme larval densities for many generations also show responses to urea: those kept at high larval densities appear to be most resistant to urea. However, these populations show no differences in adult longevity. An additional five populations were selected directly for urea resistance by adding this compound to the larval food environment. Again, there was a strong response to this artificial selection, with urea resistance increasing dramatically, but these populations showed no response in adult longevity or resistance to crowding when compared to five control populations. There is clearly no simple relationship between longevity and larval urea resistance. It may be that age-specific and density-dependent selection induce similar changes in this phenotype, but do so through different genetic and physiological pathways. We suggest that these data are not consistent with the view of constant and symmetric genetic variance-covariance matrices. These data support a more prominent role for observations of evolutionary trajectories rather than static measurements of genetic components of variance.

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