Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Baker's Law Revisited: Reproductive Assurance in a Metapopulation

John R. Pannell and Spencer C. H. Barrett
Evolution
Vol. 52, No. 3 (Jun., 1998), pp. 657-668
DOI: 10.2307/2411261
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2411261
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($4.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Baker's Law Revisited: Reproductive Assurance in a Metapopulation
Preview not available

Abstract

Baker's Law states that it is more likely for self-compatible than for self-incompatible individuals to establish sexually reproducing colonies after long-distance dispersal, because only the former can do so with a single individual. This hypothesis, proposed by H. G. Baker 40 years ago is based largely on the observation that self-compatibility is particularly frequent among colonists of oceanic islands. Here we argue that the principle of Baker's Law applies equally in the context of a metapopulation in which frequent local extinction is balanced by recolonization of sites by seed dispersal: metapopulation dynamics will select for an ability to self-fertilize. We review several studies that support this hypothesis and present a metapopulation model in which the seed productivity required by obligate outcrossers for their maintenance in a metapopulation is compared with that of selfers. Our model also estimates the reduction in the advantage of reproductive assurance to selfers as a result of perenniality and seed dormancy. In general, selection for reproductive assurance is greatest when the colony occupancy rate, p, is low and is much reduced when p approaches its maximum. This provides an explanation for the observation that many highly successful colonizers, in which p is often high, are self-incompatible. The basic model we present also lends itself to comparisons of metapopulation effects between unisexuality and cosexuality and between different modes of self-incompatibility.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
657
    657
  • Thumbnail: Page 
658
    658
  • Thumbnail: Page 
659
    659
  • Thumbnail: Page 
660
    660
  • Thumbnail: Page 
661
    661
  • Thumbnail: Page 
662
    662
  • Thumbnail: Page 
663
    663
  • Thumbnail: Page 
664
    664
  • Thumbnail: Page 
665
    665
  • Thumbnail: Page 
666
    666
  • Thumbnail: Page 
667
    667
  • Thumbnail: Page 
668
    668