If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Practical Criticism of Hennig-Brundin "Phylogentic Systematics" and Antarctic Biogeography

P. J. Darlington, Jr.
Systematic Zoology
Vol. 19, No. 1 (Mar., 1970), pp. 1-18
DOI: 10.2307/2412024
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2412024
Page Count: 18
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Practical Criticism of Hennig-Brundin
Preview not available

Abstract

Hennig's (1966) Phylogenetic Systematics is primarily concerned with cladism. The central thesis is that all taxa must be monophyletic in a special, rigid sense, and that their rank must be determined solely by time of origin. Secondary concepts are that species split in a very simple way; that one of two daughter species derived from a common ancestor will deviate more than the other; that species divide only dichotomously and that phylogenies must be dichotomous; that rates of evolution and divergence are constant and the same in different groups, unless known to be different; that relative primitiveness established at time of species-splitting remains characteristic of groups throughout their history; and that primitive groups remain at or near their places of origin. These concepts are all oversimplified, in part illogical, not consistent with real situations that are common in nature, and of no practical use in systematics or biogeography. Brundin (1966) accepts and further oversimplifies Hennig's concepts and applies them uncritically in classification of southern chironomid midges and antarctic biogeography. His supposed history of antarctic land connections, beginning in the Jurassic, is based on application of Hennig's erroneous secondary concepts, on an imaginary parallelism between chironomids and birds, and on an arbitrary decision that chironomids cannot cross water gaps although they occur in aereal plankton. His conclusions are probably wrong as to dating, as to directions of dispersal, and as to existence of continuous land connections. Existing chironomids may really have dispersed during or not long before the Tertiary, along the edges of Antarctica, and across water gaps between the southern tips of the continents and Antarctica.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18