If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

One Hundred Years of Suez Canal-A Century of Lessepsian Migration: Retrospect and Viewpoints

F. D. Por
Systematic Zoology
Vol. 20, No. 2 (Jun., 1971), pp. 138-159
DOI: 10.2307/2412054
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2412054
Page Count: 22
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
One Hundred Years of Suez Canal-A Century of Lessepsian Migration: Retrospect and Viewpoints
Preview not available

Abstract

One hundred years has passed since one of the biggest biogeographical experiments started with the opening of the Suez Canal. The successful migration along the Canal of a great many Red Sea species into the Mediterranean is seen as a process to which most of these species were preadapted in the littoral environment of the Red Sea. The repeated transgressions of this sea into the basin of the Bitter Lakes and the existence-presently and in the past-of several slightly hypersaline lagoons along its shores, resulted in the creation of a special stock of species able to perform this migration. Progress through the Canal is either a step-by-step one, or a result of active swimming (or transport). Neither the role of planktonic spread by means of larvae and/or currents, nor the obstacles put by the salinity, should be overemphasized. The main factors in helping or hindering migration are considered to be the presence of suitable substrates and water transparencies in the Canal. The Levant Basin of the Mediterranean was also "preadapted" to receive the immigrants because of its high salinity and temperature and the resulting biological undersaturation with temperate fauna. Most probably this explains the one-way stream of the migrants into the Mediterranean. The distribution limits of the immigrants in the Mediterranean are most probably set by the increasing competitive capacities of the aboriginal species. The westward advance of the immigrants in the Mediterranean will probably become more pronounced after the damming of the Nile waters behind the newly erected Asswan dam.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159