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An Evolutionary Systematist's View of Classification

Peter D. Ashlock
Systematic Zoology
Vol. 28, No. 4 (Dec., 1979), pp. 441-450
DOI: 10.2307/2412559
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2412559
Page Count: 10
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An Evolutionary Systematist's View of Classification
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Abstract

The goal of evolutionary systematics, to provide classifications of maximum utility through maximum use of evolutionary theory, has failed of accomplishment to the extent that practitioners of evolutionary systematics have relied upon descriptive rather than theoretical definitions of terms. Monophyly and related terms are discussed, a new definition of higher taxon is provided, and a new methodology for producing classifications of maximum utility, employing cladistic and anagenetic analysis, is partly outlined. Cladists, by ignoring a significant part of evolutionary theory, produce classifications that are less useful to systematist and nonsystematist alike.

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