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Preservice Music Education Student Fears of the Internship and Initial Inservice Teaching Experience

Steven N. Kelly
Contributions to Music Education
Vol. 27, No. 1 (2000), pp. 41-50
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24127017
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preservice Music Education Student Fears of the Internship and Initial Inservice Teaching Experience
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Abstract

Among the responsibilities music teacher-training programs have is to ensure that students develop sufficient subject-matter expertise, appropriate instructional techniques, and adequate classroom management skills to progress through the music education internship and into the beginning years of inservice teaching. Studies have found that during the pre-internship period music education students have specific fears which could be related to the effectiveness of their training. These fears may continue into the students ' internship experiences and their initial years of inservice teaching. The purpose of this study was to attain, classify, and compare preservice undergraduate students' fears or concerns regarding the student teaching internship period and the initial inservice teaching experience. Prior to their internship, 62 music education majors were surveyed regarding fears or concerns they had of their internship and initial inservice teaching experiences. The findings appear to indicate preservice students are generally secure about their internship and initial inservice year of teaching except in the areas of handling discipline problems, working with their supervisor or principal, and dealing with non-teaching duties and responsibilities.

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