Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Will All Be Remembered? The Exclusion of Etzel and Lehi Fallen from the State Narrative: Bereavement, Memory and the Political Delegitimation Strategy against the Herut Party / 'ונזכור את כולם'?הרחקת חללי האצ"ל והלח"י מן 'הסיפור' הממלכתי: על שכול, זיכרון ותיאוריית הדה-לגיטימציה נגד 'חרות'

אודי לבל and Udi Lebel
Democratic Culture / תרבות דמוקרטית
Vol. 11 (תשס"ח / 2007), pp. 77-105
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24143598
Page Count: 29
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Will All Be Remembered? The Exclusion of Etzel and Lehi Fallen from the State Narrative: Bereavement, Memory and the Political Delegitimation Strategy against the Herut Party / 'ונזכור את כולם'?הרחקת חללי האצ"ל והלח"י מן 'הסיפור' הממלכתי: על שכול, זיכרון ותיאוריית הדה-לגיטימציה נגד 'חרות'
Preview not available

Abstract

This article discusses the sphere of bereavement and memory, a significant component in the activities of political actors attempting to acquire power and delegitimize rivals. It also seeks to illustrate the connection between political investment in past self-image and the transference of that image to contemporary and future political standing. This conceptual framework is employed to reveal the efforts of the ruling political party, Mapai, during the first decades following the foundation of the State of Israel, to shape a sphere of state bereavement and memory. This sphere excluded the fallen soldiers of the dissident underground, Etzel and Lehi, while including the fallen of the Haganah, the underground military wing of the establishment, during the struggle for political independence. On the other hand, the behavior of the political opposition, Herut, appears consonant with research descriptions of groups excluded from state memory who seek inclusion and thus political legitimacy in order to appear fit to hold state office in the future. Entrance into the circle of official memory transpires in direct relation to the degree of public legitimacy the outside contender amasses. The article opens with a theoretical framework that clarifies the central concepts employed in the course of the analysis, focusing especially on the linkage between memory, bereavement, domination and political delegitimation. This is followed by an account of the dynamics emerging from the interaction of the aforementioned factors in the various public spheres (political, historiographical, geographical, political communication), through identifying the political negotiating stances over memory that occurred in each of these between Mapai and Herut representatives over their underground fallen. The article seeks to show that the field of memory is a product of political engineering geared to political interests and strategies, which often finds its sharpest delineation during the period of state-foundation and state-building when hegemony issues are most salient.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105