If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Case for Keeping Cornus in the Broad Linnaean Sense

Richard H. Eyde
Systematic Botany
Vol. 12, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1987), pp. 505-518
DOI: 10.2307/2418886
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2418886
Page Count: 14
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Case for Keeping Cornus in the Broad Linnaean Sense
Preview not available

Abstract

The concept we call Cornus sensu lato was milleniums old when Carl Linnaeus wrote Species plantarum. Following tradition, he viewed Cornus as embracing the cornelian cherry and the bractless dogwoods; following Dillenius and Plukenet, he added dwarf cornels and flowering dogwood. Today, in eastern Europe and in Asia, steadfast splitters view all those as genera-Cornus sensu stricto, Swida, Chamaepericlymenum, Cynoxylon-and make four more from dogwoods that Linnaeus did not know-Afrocrania, Bothrocaryum, Dendrobenthamia, Discocrania. No one's thoughts on evolution mandate splitting-all agree the segregates are closer to each other than to any group outside of Cornus-and there are the following reasons for retaining Cornus in its broad sense: some splits were made on weak grounds (Chamaepericlymenum) or on arguments now overweighed by other evidence (Dendrobenthamia crosses with Cynoxylon). In England, Japan, and North America, experiments with splitting won few converts. Splitting upsets nomenclature, making it depend on how one views the names of Rafinesque or where one sees divergence of the dogwood subgroups. Indeed, splitting hinders thinking on divergence (those who split off Afrocrania, for instance, lose sight of its kinship with cornelian cherry), and misaligning subgroups within Cornus hinders circumscription of Cornaceae, a most unruly family.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518