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Pollination Biology and Taxonomy of Dinemandra and Dinemagonum (Malpighiaceae)

Beryl B. Simpson
Systematic Botany
Vol. 14, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1989), pp. 408-426
DOI: 10.2307/2418932
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2418932
Page Count: 19
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Pollination Biology and Taxonomy of Dinemandra and Dinemagonum (Malpighiaceae)
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Abstract

Dinemandra and Dinemagonum, the only two genera of Malpighiaceae in Chile, have calyx glands borne on stalks rather than appressed to the surfaces of the calyx lobes as is typical of malpighs. It is proposed that this positioning of the glandular secretory surfaces (elaiophores) on the ends of stalks provides an intergland distance and surface area needed for the robust Centris bees that serve as pollinators. The structure of the stalked calyx glands and similarities in pollen provide evidence for the close relationships of the two genera despite their traditional placement in different tribes. However, the sister group of the two genera is impossible to determine at the present time. Extensive collections of both genera in the desertic regions of northern Chile where they are endemic has shown that each is monotypic. The previous recognition of several species in each genus resulted from few available specimens and a tendency, particularly in the case of Dinemandra, for plants from small isolated populations to have rather distinctive morphologies.

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