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Phylogenetic Analysis of the Cultivated and Wild Species of Phaseolus (Fabaceae)

Alfonso Delgado-Salinas, Tom Turley, Adam Richman and Matt Lavin
Systematic Botany
Vol. 24, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1999), pp. 438-460
DOI: 10.2307/2419699
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2419699
Page Count: 23
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Phylogenetic Analysis of the Cultivated and Wild Species of Phaseolus (Fabaceae)
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Abstract

The species of Phaseolus were exhaustively sampled for both ITS/5.8S DNA sequence and non-molecular data. With all related New World genera designated as outgroups, a phylogenetic analysis of combined data reveals a strongly supported monophyletic Phaseolus. Other well supported relationships include nine monophyletic species clades within Phaseolus, designated as the P. vulgaris, P. filiformis, P. lunatus, P. polystachios, P. leptostachyus, P. pauciflorus, P. tuerckheimii, and P. pedicellatus groups, and P. microcarpus. Only the last of these is monotypic and consistently resolved in a sensitivity analysis as the earliest branch in the Phaseolus clade, though with poor bootstrap support. The five most commonly domesticated species in the genus arise from within the P. vulgaris and P. lunatus groups. The "gene pools" traditionally recognized for the domesticated species P. vulgaris and P. lunatus are not detected with ITS sequence variation. This is in spite of a very high degree of inter- and intra-specific ITS sequence divergence in Phaseolus.

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