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Ecological Studies of the Vegetation of the Great Smoky Mountains. II. The Quadrat Method Applied to Sampling Spruce and Fir Forest Types

Stanley A. Cain
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 16, No. 4 (Jul., 1935), pp. 566-584
DOI: 10.2307/2419853
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2419853
Page Count: 19
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecological Studies of the Vegetation of the Great Smoky Mountains. II. The Quadrat Method Applied to Sampling Spruce and Fir Forest Types
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Abstract

1. A brief description is given of examples of two forest types in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park: The Red Spruce Type (Piceetum rubentis) and the Southern Balsam Fir Type (Abietum Fraseri). 2. A method of sampling the arborescent strata (similar to that widely in use for non-arborescent communities is described. a. The method is based on a random sample by minimum area quadrats. b. The minimum area quadrat is determined for each community type by the form of species-area curves. c. The surveys based upon different numbers of minimum area quadrats are compared statistically by use of basal area data to determine the necessary number of quadrats to be investigated. d. It is suggested that the quadrat method may be applicable to commercial cruising if applied on a basis of sub-types and site classes. e. Forest types, sub-types, and site classes will probably be found to be characterized by certain species inferior to the tree layer, although the present paper does not contain definite investigations of that aspect. 3. It is thought that Abies Fraseri must be recognized as forming, in the Great Smoky Mountains at least, a forest type in which it is the sole dominant.

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