Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Ficus In Florida. II. African Species

Mary F. Barrett
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 39, No. 1 (Jan., 1948), pp. 188-219
DOI: 10.2307/2421442
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2421442
Page Count: 32
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ficus In Florida. II. African Species
Preview not available

Abstract

The name Ficus afzelii G. Don ex Loudon has been approved instead of the frequently used F. eriobotryoides Kunth & Bouche. This has caused the making of two new combinations by the transference of varieties of the latter species to F. afzelii. The description of F. bussei has been much enlarged. The synonymy of F. capensis has been increased by the addition of several forms previously thought to be varieties. A key has been made to the synonyms of this species, which, with the discussion, shows a spiral relationship rather than varieties. The correct name, F. lyrata Warb., has been emphasized instead of the commonly used F. pandurata. Distinctions have been made between F. natalensis Hochst. ex Krauss and F. dekdekena (Miq.) A. Richard, and F. volkensii Warb. has been shown to be a part of the synonymy of the former species. A brief discussion of the historical background of F. sycomorus L. has been made, in addition to the usual synonymy, etc. F. vogelii (Miq.) Miq. has been distinguished from F. nekbudu Warb. Other species which have been suggested as related to them have been discussed and a key made. Among these species F. lyrata is easily identified by its fiddle-shaped leaf, F. bussei by the overlapping basal folds of the blade, and F. afzelii by its obovate or oblanceolate blade without overlapping folds. These are very largeleaved forms. F. capensis usually has blades with a toothed or sinuate margin. This species and F. sycomorus bear figs in bunches on the tree trunk and large branches. F. sycomorus has roundish blades. F. vogelii and F. nekbudu have rather large obovate or elliptical blades. Both are fairly common in Florida. Natalensis and dekdekena are small leaved forms, rather obovate and not very characteristic. I have not seen the former in Florida.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219