Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Snow and Meltwater Effects in an Area of Colorado Alpine

J. Gary Holway and Richard T. Ward
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 69, No. 1 (Jan., 1963), pp. 189-197
DOI: 10.2307/2422853
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2422853
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Snow and Meltwater Effects in an Area of Colorado Alpine
Preview not available

Abstract

Some related but different situations pertaining to the effects of snow cover and meltwater on alpine vegetation were analyzed. One was concerned with the vegetational and phenologic differences correlated with the melting back of a late season snowbank, another had to do with the comparative response of plants in a snow-free trough with that on adjacent areas of heavy drifting, and the last involved the diversion of meltwater to an area where natural flow had become negligible. The primary responses observed in the present study were the delay of normal plant development, the failure in some species to complete certain phases of the life cycle, and the replacement of certain species by different ones. In the center of the late snowbank area, species such as Deschampsia caespitosa and Trifolium parryi, which were abundant and vigorous in the outer portion of the basin, were very reduced in size, number and general vitality. Carex pyrenaica, rare to the outside, was much more abundant in the center of the basin, where the growing season was five to six weeks' duration. The differences in the snow-free trough area were primarily phenologic, although Sibbaldia procumbens showed a marked affinity for areas where snow accumulates. The artificial application of cold meltwater resulted in a delay in flowering for the majority of species, ranging from a week to as much as one month.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197