Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Substrate-oriented Distribution of Bristlecone Pine in the White Mountains of California

R. D. Wright and H. A. Mooney
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 73, No. 2 (Apr., 1965), pp. 257-284
DOI: 10.2307/2423454
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2423454
Page Count: 28
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Substrate-oriented Distribution of Bristlecone Pine in the White Mountains of California
Preview not available

Abstract

The bristlecone pine zone in the White Mountains of California occupies the elevational belt from approximately 9,500 to 11,500 ft. The climate in this region is dry and cold, with mean annual precipitation of 12 to 13 inches, and mean annual temperature of approximately 35 F. Three geologic substrates are widespread in the bristlecone pine zone: dolomite, quartzitic sandstone, and granite. Dolomitic soil is light colored and cool, with relatively higher available water, high pH, and a lower nutrient status, in comparison with other soils. The distribution of bristlecone pine is complementary to that of sagebrush, the other major dominant in the subalpine zone. Bristlecone pine is well developed on dolomite soils and is favored by north slopes. Sagebrush is best developed on sandstone and granitic soils, particularly on south slopes. The greater development of bristlecone pine on dolomitic soils appears related primarily to the better water relations of these soils, tolerance of bristlecone pine for low nutrient availability, and the lack of competitors. Sagebrush apparently is intolerant of the low nutrient status of dolomitic soils, and can persist on the more xeric substrates and slopes because of a greater drought tolerance than bristlecone pine. Experimental evidence is provided to substantiate these observations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
257
    257
  • Thumbnail: Page 
258
    258
  • Thumbnail: Page 
259
    259
  • Thumbnail: Page 
260
    260
  • Thumbnail: Page 
261
    261
  • Thumbnail: Page 
262
    262
  • Thumbnail: Page 
263
    263
  • Thumbnail: Page 
264
    264
  • Thumbnail: Page 
265
    265
  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
284
    284