Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Some Little Known Aspects of Spider Behavior

B. J. Kaston
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 73, No. 2 (Apr., 1965), pp. 336-356
DOI: 10.2307/2423458
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2423458
Page Count: 21
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Little Known Aspects of Spider Behavior
Preview not available

Abstract

A number of species of the theridiid genus, Conopistha, are known to be commensals, and some have been found to be even parasites in the webs of other spiders. Some representatives of families that ordinarily resort to snares for entrapping prey have evolved other devices, such as the bolas, the retiarius, or even a single strand used as a spring. Though they have complete webs, Theridiosoma and Hyptiotes use them as springs. Scytodes ensnares prey by means of a gummy substance ejected from its poison fangs. A number of instances are known of vertebrates serving as food, and members of the two families, Mimetidae and Archaeidae, feed solely on other spiders. In some species the mother spider is eaten by her young, and interestingly enough in one of these species the mother displays a considerable amount of brood care, even to feeding the spiderlings. For these and others it is to be expected that there will be some social life before the spiderlings disperse, but there are a number of species which, contrary to the usual situation among spiders, remain social throughout life, often in colonies of several hundreds. At least some spiders apparently can orient by using polarized light, can hear, and can perceive odors. Some lyriform organs apparently function in olfaction, but other such organs serve as vibration detectors, and still others as proprioceptors.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342
  • Thumbnail: Page 
343
    343
  • Thumbnail: Page 
344
    344
  • Thumbnail: Page 
345
    345
  • Thumbnail: Page 
346
    346
  • Thumbnail: Page 
347
    347
  • Thumbnail: Page 
348
    348
  • Thumbnail: Page 
349
    349
  • Thumbnail: Page 
350
    350
  • Thumbnail: Page 
351
    351
  • Thumbnail: Page 
352
    352
  • Thumbnail: Page 
353
    353
  • Thumbnail: Page 
354
    354
  • Thumbnail: Page 
355
    355
  • Thumbnail: Page 
356
    356