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Neue (alte) Konfliktlinien in der Europapolitik: Die Parlamentsdebatte zum Vertrag von Lissabon im Deutschen Bundestag

Andreas Wimmel
Zeitschrift für Parlamentsfragen
Vol. 40, No. 4 (2009), pp. 746-758
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/24239096
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Neue (alte) Konfliktlinien in der Europapolitik: Die Parlamentsdebatte zum Vertrag von Lissabon im Deutschen Bundestag
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Abstract

Ideas and positions of German parties towards European integration have long been characterised by the model of an economically and politically integrated state community. This general principle has been supported by a clear majority of deputies from all government and opposition parties since the Treaties of Rome until today (with the recent exception of the socialist left) so that conflicts on fundamental EU decisions between the two large people's parties have been avoided so far. Comparing the parliamentary debate on the ratification of the Treaty of Lisbon with those on the Treaties of Maastricht and Nice reveals that this pro-EU consensus persists in principle. However, in the wake of Eastern enlargement and with the new Left Party being part of the Bundestag it has weakened. Responding to this, the Social Democrats (SPD) have realigned their position on European integration towards a "social Europe", for the first time distinguishing their position from that of the Christian Democrats.

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