Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Biology of Young Belted Kingfishers

Lawrence Kilham
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 92, No. 1 (Jul., 1974), pp. 245-247
DOI: 10.2307/2424222
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2424222
Page Count: 3

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Bird nesting, Excreta, Eyes, Liquids, Refraction, Tadpoles
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Biology of Young Belted Kingfishers
Preview not available

Abstract

Raising three young captive belted kingfishers (Megaceryle alcyon) from nestlings until they were able to catch their own prey brought out points regarding their biology. These, in terms of their natural history, were: (1) that nestlings eject liquid excreta forcefully up against nest walls in alt directions, then bury them by a constant habit of rapping that knocks down sand .and dirt; (2) young kingfishers can dive and catch prey under water within a week of fledging without 'being taught by parents; (3) kingfishers, when about to dive, appear to be using the two white spots in front of the eyes as sighting devices along the line of the bill to fix their prey and, by doing so, possibly to correct for the refraction of water.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247