Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Energy Allocation Patterns of a Sprouting and a Nonsprouting Species of Arctostaphylos in the California Chaparral

Jon E. Keeley and Sterling C. Keeley
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 98, No. 1 (Jul., 1977), pp. 1-10
DOI: 10.2307/2424710
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2424710
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Energy Allocation Patterns of a Sprouting and a Nonsprouting Species of Arctostaphylos in the California Chaparral
Preview not available

Abstract

The r- and K-selection theory was used to generate testable hypotheses about patterns of energy allocation in two chaparral shrubs of different reproductive strategies. Terminal-branchlet vegetative and reproductive biomass of the nonsprouting Arctostaphylos glauca and the sprouting A. glandulosa were sampled in a 23-year-old and a 90-year-old stand of chaparral to test the predictions that: (1) the terminal vegetative growth (g dry weight/m2 of areal coverage) would be equal in the two species, in both stands; (2) oven dry weight (g) of reproductive parts/m2 of areal coverage would be greater in A. glauca than in A. glandulosa in both aged populations; (3) allocation to reproductive parts by the shrubs in the 23-year-old stand would be greater than (or equal to) that of the 90-year-old shrubs. The amount of terminal vegetative growth was equal for both species in the 23-year-old and the 90-year-old stands. There was no statistically significant difference in the weight of fruits produced by the two species in the 23-year-old stand. However, fruit production by A. glauca was significantly greater than by A. glandulosa in the 90-year-old stand. Fruit production was also significantly greater for the older A. glauca shrubs than for those in the 23-year-old stand. The relationships of rainfall pattern and age of shrubs to fruit production are discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10