Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Aggregation of Lady Beetles on the Shores of Lakes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

Richard E. Lee, Jr.
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 104, No. 2 (Oct., 1980), pp. 295-304
DOI: 10.2307/2424869
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2424869
Page Count: 10

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Aggregation, Beetles, Lakeshores, Female animals, Autumn, Overwintering, Fats, Summer, Winter, Beaches
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aggregation of Lady Beetles on the Shores of Lakes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Aggregations of lady beetles, predominately Hippodamia convergens and H. tredecimpunctata, were commonly observed on the shores of lakes in the Upper Midwest during the autumn and spring. The beetles remain on the shore for only a short time, usually dispersing within 2-3 weeks. Lady bettles from autumn shore aggregations and overwintering aggregations are characterized by the presence of large amounts of fat, reproductive inactivitiy, empty digestive tracts, a skew in the sex ratio favoring females and the behavioral tendency to form aggregations. Hippodamia convergens, the most commonly observed coccinellid in shore aggregations, undergoes long migratory flights to and from overwintering sites in California. It is suggested that similar migratory activity occurs in the Upper Midwest and that during these flights the beetles may be blown into the water and washed ashore, thus forming the aggregations. However, in contrast with the overwintering aggregations in California, the shore aggregations reported in this study appear to be temporary shoreline collections and not the overwintering site.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
295
    295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304