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Microbial Floristics of a Managed Tallgrass Prairie

R. P. Herman and C. L. Kucera
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 101, No. 1 (Jan., 1979), pp. 13-20
DOI: 10.2307/2424896
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2424896
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Microbial Floristics of a Managed Tallgrass Prairie
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Abstract

The structure of the microbial community of a central Missouri tallgrass prairie was analyzed for 2 years. Dead biomass accumulation effected by burning, mowing and mulching as compared to no treatment was studied with respect to its influence on mycofloristic composition and bacterial numbers. The greatest diversity of fungi was found where biomass was removed by burning; in addition, two pyrophytic species were restricted to fire plots. The areas in which biomass was allowed to accumulate had the fewest species. Mycofloristic similarities as measured by similarity index were greatest between treatment areas with similar litter accumulation patterns. Thus, burned and mowed areas resembled each other in their mycofloras and mulched and control plots were similar. The greatest differences were between mowed vs. mulched areas and burned vs. mulched areas. Plate counts yielded more bacteria in general, and a higher percentage of actinomycetes in areas with litter removed than in areas with litter accumulation. The burned and mowed areas were statistically the same, but were significantly different from the mulched and control areas.

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