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Ecological Consequences of Food Limitation for Adult Mantids (Tenodera ardifolia sinensis Saussure)

R. M. Eisenberg, L. E. Hurd and J. A. Bartley
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 106, No. 2 (Oct., 1981), pp. 209-218
DOI: 10.2307/2425157
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2425157
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecological Consequences of Food Limitation for Adult Mantids (Tenodera ardifolia sinensis Saussure)
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Abstract

Comparative studies between adult mantids (Tenodera ardifolia sinensis) in field populations and cohorts maintained in the laboratory on ad lib. diets suggest that females in field populations were food-limited. Food limitation apparently occurred in two cases during the time of acquiring energy to produce oothecae and in one case prior to maturation. In each case the net result was decreased fecundity We recognize two distinct components to the life history food requirements of this species: (1) the food required to reach maturity, and (2) the additional food required by females to produce oothecae. Our data suggest that food availability for nymphs affects initial sizes of adults, which in turn determines potential weight gain during the adult portion of the life cycle. Both the magnitude of this potential and the extent to which it is realized affects fecundity. The constraints imposed on either food component by membership in, and reliance upon, a seasonal insect community have implications for the ecological success of this introduced species.

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