Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Evidence of Plant Succession on Granite Outcrops of the Georgia Piedmont

Madeline P. Burbanck and Donald L. Phillips
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 109, No. 1 (Jan., 1983), pp. 94-104
DOI: 10.2307/2425520
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2425520
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Evidence of Plant Succession on Granite Outcrops of the Georgia Piedmont
Preview not available

Abstract

Successional changes are taking place in the vegetation of certain "island communities" on granitic rock outcrops in the Lithonia, Georgia, area (Piedmont Plateau). The floristic composition and maximum soil depths of 34 communities, first studied in 1957, were re-examined in 1968 and 1976-1978. Maximum soil depth tended to increase over time. Sixteen of the 34 communities studied showed successional changes in floristic composition, confirming the earlier hypothesis that lichen-annual, annual-perennial and herb-shrub communities represent seral stages as soil depth increases. There are characteristic plants and maximum soil depths for each stage, with overlapping depth ranges. Diamorpha communities, which occur on the shallowest soils, have remained unchanged floristically and maximum soil depths have changed only slightly. With 1-12 cm increases in soil depths, three lichen-annual communities became annual-perennial communities, four annual-perennial communities progressed to an herb-shrub or shrub-tree stage, and one herb-shrub community became a shrubtree community Shrub-tree communities may represent an edaphic climax subject to periodic regression to earlier seral stages.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104