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The Birth and Spread of a Plant Population

A. R. Kruckeberg
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 116, No. 2 (Oct., 1986), pp. 403-410
DOI: 10.2307/2425749
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2425749
Page Count: 8
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The Birth and Spread of a Plant Population
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Abstract

The establishment and increase over a 20-year period of a new plant population is reported. The European perennial, Silene paradoxa L. (Caryophyllaceae), was introduced as 27 transplants in 1964 to a serpentine barren in western Washington. In 1983 nearly 1000 plants were present in size classes ranging from seedlings to the original transplants. The new colony is still vigorous and locally expanding its numbers. The implications of a recorded introduction and spread of a population are discussed; inferences on demographic and microevolutionary consequences of this founder population are examined.

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