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Journal Article

Analyses of Annual Surveys of White and Gray Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Olney, Illinois, 1977-1986

J. E. Stencel and A. W. Ghent
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 118, No. 2 (Oct., 1987), pp. 251-257
DOI: 10.2307/2425782
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2425782
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Analyses of Annual Surveys of White and Gray Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Olney, Illinois, 1977-1986
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Abstract

Annual October surveys by over 30 Olney, Illinois, volunteer squirrel counters provide a decade of population indices for the white and gray phenotypes. These indicate that variation around an overall 10-year average of 22.6% white has been acceptably random. A weak and inconsistent decline in the numbers of both phenotypes is noted. Statistical analyses indicate that the counts of the two phenotypes have varied in synchrony over the past decade, with no evidence of competitive increases by either phenotype at the expense of the other. A weak correlation across survey districts between the population densities of squirrels and of trees greater than 15 cm dbh was detected. Above-median squirrel densities were clustered in the older central districts of Olney, with below-median densities in the newer suburbs. Some speculation is presented about the history of this Olney mutation before and after its first observation in 1902, and about the possibility that some degree of heterosis may explain the appearance of small white squirrel populations in at least 19 other North American communities.

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