Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Land-use History and the Occurrence of Exotic Earthworms in the Mountains of Eastern Kentucky

P. J. Kalisz and D. B. Dotson
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 122, No. 2 (Oct., 1989), pp. 288-297
DOI: 10.2307/2425915
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2425915
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Land-use History and the Occurrence of Exotic Earthworms in the Mountains of Eastern Kentucky
Preview not available

Abstract

Examination of earthworm species composition on sites representing a range of land-use histories indicated that assemblages composed entirely of native taxa are the norm on areas that have not been cleared of forest or otherwise severely disturbed. The exotic taxa Octolasion tyrtaeum, Lumbricus terrestris, L. rubellus, L. castaneous and Pheretima s.l. were found on relatively small and scattered sites which had been severely disturbed (e.g., cleared, cultivated, inhabited). The genus Diplocardia dominated native assemblages on slightly disturbed sites, and generally persisted in spite of severe disturbance and the introduction of exotic taxa. In contrast, populations of Komarekiona eatoni and Eisenoides carolinensis were much reduced or eliminated by forest removal, and were apparently then replaced by exotic species. Octolasion tyrtaeum occurred both in clearings and in forests, and was the most widely distributed and frequently encountered exotic species. Octolasion tyrtaeum may directly compete with the native topsoil-inhabiting species, K. eatoni and E. carolinensis, when they co-occur on forested sites.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
288
    288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
293
    293
  • Thumbnail: Page 
294
    294
  • Thumbnail: Page 
295
    295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297