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Food of the Evening Bat Nycticeius humeralis from Indiana

John O. Whitaker, Jr. and Phil Clem
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 127, No. 1 (Jan., 1992), pp. 211-214
DOI: 10.2307/2426339
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2426339
Page Count: 4
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Food of the Evening Bat Nycticeius humeralis from Indiana
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Abstract

The major foods of evening bats Nycticeius humeralis in Clay County, Indiana, were beetles, moths and leafhoppers, comprising 60, 19.7 and 7.0% of the total volume of food, respectively. The species eaten in greatest quantity (14.2% total volume) was the pest, Diabrotica undecimpunctata, the spotted cucumber beetle (its larva is the southern corn rootworm). The carabid beetle, Calathus sp., was also important, and the two most important cicadellids were Draeculacephala antica and Paraphlepsius irroratus. Stinkbugs (Pentatomidae) and chinchbugs (Lygaeidae) were other important foods. Bats in this colony ate ca. 6.3 million insects per year.

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