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Summer Roosts of the Endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) on the Northern Edge of Its Range

Allen Kurta, David King, Joseph A. Teramino, John M. Stribley and Kimberly J. Williams
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 129, No. 1 (Jan., 1993), pp. 132-138
Published by: University of Notre Dame
DOI: 10.2307/2426441
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2426441
Page Count: 7
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Summer Roosts of the Endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) on the Northern Edge of Its Range
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Abstract

We discovered a reproductively active colony of the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) only 15 km S of the northern edge of the species' range in Michigan. Eight different roost trees were located, and all were green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica). This is the first report of Indiana bat maternity colonies using green ash. Unlike maternity colonies in more southern states, all roost trees in Michigan were exposed to direct sunlight throughout the day. Bats were still present as late as 10 September, well after the beginning of the swarming (mating) season at southern hibernacula. Population size at the main roost tree varied from 4-45. These bats roosted underneath the loose bark of dead trees, and we hypothesized that intertree movement was a response to the ephemeral nature of such roosting sites.

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