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Comparative Responses of Lonicera maackii (Amur Honeysuckle) and Lindera benzoin (Spicebush) to Increased Light

James O. Luken, Linda M. Kuddes, Tim C. Tholemeier and David M. Haller
The American Midland Naturalist
Vol. 138, No. 2 (Oct., 1997), pp. 331-343
DOI: 10.2307/2426826
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2426826
Page Count: 13
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Comparative Responses of Lonicera maackii (Amur Honeysuckle) and Lindera benzoin (Spicebush) to Increased Light
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Abstract

In shadehouses providing 1%, 25%, and 100% of full sun photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), we measured growth, acclimation of net photosynthesis (An), and leaf- and branch-level plasticity of two deciduous shrubs, a nonindigenous species [Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder] and an indigenous species [Lindera benzoin (L.) Blume]. This comparative research assessed potential plant performance in response to modified disturbance regimens that increase light availaiblity. When forest-grown shrubs were moved to conditions of increased light, Lonicera maackii had maximum stem growth at 100% PPFD, higher An in pre-existing leaves, greater acclimation ability in pre-existing leaves, and greater plasticity of stomatal density and branch-level allocation. Maximum stem growth of Lindera benzoin occurred at 25% PPFD. The inability of this species to use light above 25% PPFD was likely the result of biochemical limitation to carbon capture although relatively greater allocation of energy to roots may have contributed. As canopy thinning and fragmentation increase light availability in disturbed forests, high-resource invasive species such as L. maackii are likely to assume greater importance with concomitant decreases in importance of low-resource species such as L. benzoin.

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